Cotswold Life magazine May 2019

Article  on ' Into the woods' exhibition, Chipping Norton Theatre, as part  of Oxford Artweeks  Open Studios

Wall-art by artist Caroline Nixon is not only inspired by the woodland – Caroline even gathers local pieces of nature to use in her creations which you can see both in Chipping Norton Theatre and her Long Compton studio.

Taking regular walks to the mystical Wychwood Woods to forage for interesting leaves, Caroline is also an avid collector of fallen leaves at Batsford Arboretum. Just below an ancient drover’s ridge where the Rollright Stones stand, her garden too is a treasure trove of plants used to make natural dyes for her botanical contact printing process, a contemporary adaptation of the ancient art of dyeing cloth with plant-based pigments. Caroline rolls and binds an arrangement of leaves tightly against the fabric before applying heat and pressure to coax the pigment out of the leaf and into the cloth. I have a wooden studio in the garden, but I work outside whenever I can, with tables all over the grass,’ she smiles.

‘There’s a huge amount of science behind the dying process,’ explains Caroline who, after a career as a GP, is fascinated by the chemistry involved. ‘Many of the plants that you would expect to be great for colouring fabrics – like beetroot and elderberries – are “fugitive” dyes, in that the delicious purple of their juice turns brown after only a few hours and then begins to fade.’

‘For some of my pieces I use a totally natural palette, in the earthy greens and browns of the forest floor, or for brighter colours I introduce marigolds for yellow; the bark of the tropical tree logwood can be used for a whole spectrum of blues and purples from gentle lavender to dark navy or cochineal adds a bright pink. This is a dye that comes from a beetle and I source it from a Mexican cooperative who have an ethical approach and grow the beetle on cactuses! Closer to home, in the garden I grow a plant called Madder that grows like crazy and I use its root for those rich terracotta oranges and reds you see in traditional oriental carpets.  It’s one of the world’s oldest known dyes.’

Caroline creates fabrics for wearable art – from scarves and bags to jackets – as well as hanging textiles for interiors and framed pictures. For the latter she first prints treated paper and then heavily it embellishes with dyed threads and stitch. ‘I am inspired to create by the shapes of the leaves themselves,’ she enthuses. ‘There is an art nouveau shape and symmetry to many: the fig leaf, for example, is bold and dramatic and suggests an almost geometric design whilst feathery leaves lend themselves to delicate patterns. Gustav’s Klimt’s work too is perhaps a subliminal influence. I’m looking to add gilding and introduce a little real gold leaf into my wall art, as well as making hand-bound books and lampshades, and the shadows will add the intrigue of the woods at twilight.’

For more on these artists and hundreds of art events across the North Cotswolds during the Oxfordshire Artweeks festival visit www.artweeks.org.

Published in the May 2019 edition of Cotswold Life

Another mention and lovely photo from no serial number magazine

Caroline Nixon: Eco-Printing and Upcycling from Warwickshire

“Eco-printing is the antithesis of today’s ‘throwaway’ society”

Specialised in eco-printing and natural colours, Caroline Nixon is a textile artist living and working in Warwickshire, UK. She uses botanical contact printing and natural dyeing combined with the shibori technique to create beautiful designs. Caroline usually upcycles and dyes the clothes and textiles that she finds in charity shops to make jackets, coats, dresses, t-shirts, shirts, and scarves.

Photography by Luana Calabrò, Model Naina Bajaria

Caroline also has a passion for producing very special and meaningful pieces. And so, she encourages her clients to come up with leaves from their own garden or with plants that have special memories for them. She can even print your wedding bouquet onto a camisole or silk kimono!

A mention for my upcycled clothes in the Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/francesca-palange/reclaim-fashion-its-time-_b_12308454.html

Wool jacket featured in No Serial Number magazine
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Photoshoot by Noserialnumber.com Photographer: Luana Calabrò for No Serial Number Magazine and Model: Naina Bajaria

My cocoon coat featured on front cover of autumn edition of No Serial Number magazine
Photoshoot by Noserialnumber.com Photographer: Luana Calabrò for No Serial Number Magazine and Model: Naina Bajaria
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Cocoon coat in autumn edition of No serial Number magazine
www.noserialnumber.com/ subscriptions
Photoshoot by Noserialnumber.com Photographer: Luana Calabrò for No Serial Number Magazine and Model: Naina Bajaria

My cocoon jacket featured in publicity poster for No Serial Number magazine
Photoshoot by Noserialnumber.com Photographer: Luana Calabrò for No Serial Number Magazine and Model: Naina Bajaria